Greta Thunberg, how to save the planet in my opinion (and the major scientists)

Eighteen chapters, 446 pages: the girl who protested alone with the 'Strike for the climate' sign is out of blah blah blah and now, with the help of experts, she says how to do it. To the powerful and to us

  Fridays For Future global climate action day in Berlin How to save planet Earth? Greta Thunberg, 19, has her recipe: see the photos Photo Video

«In life there are no “black and white” issues, it is one of the crucial principles of our current society», begins Greta Thunberg, «but there are areas that “are” black or white. In the long run you can't be a little sustainable. Either it is or it is not. It's like walking on a sheet of ice: either it supports your weight or you fall into deep, cold water.' To be or not to be. The most famous activist of our time has reached the existential watershed: we can no longer postpone the commitment to defend the planet from the climate crisis. – Photo | video

Greta Thunberg and that surprise quote about nuclear energy Greta Thunberg and that surprise quote about nuclear energy

Greta Thunberg surprise: “I'm ready to pass the megaphone to others

HIS REVOLUTION IN THE CLIMATE BOOK – The Revolution of Greta is in a “Manifesto” 446 pages long, made up of five parts, 18 chapters and 101 sub-chapters: it is entitled The Climate Book, the 'climate book' (released worldwide, in Italy with Mondadori): the photograph of the situation is the premise for indicating the concrete solutions with which to stop the catastrophe on the brink of which, as he explains to us, we all find ourselves. The Swedish girl – twenty years old on January 3rd – had (almost) made us think that she had really taken a step to the side, who in August 2018 had skipped school to start demonstrating alone in front of the Stockholm Parliament, with a placard in hand, against government inaction on global warming. Unsuspected Pied Piper, she had first involved her comrades, and then young people from all over the world with the Friday demonstrations, which had become a global protest movement, the Fridays For Future. In this last period of the pandemic, however, she had reduced her public appearances, urging her friends and colleagues in the struggle, such as the Ugandan Vanessa Nakate, to take the front row. Just a few lunges: a year ago, on the eve of the UN climate summit (COP26 in Glasgow) she lashed out at world leaders, accusing them of only doing 'bla bla bla'. Now she has taken care of that 'bla bla bla' fill it with content. You will not enter politics – you have just declared to the BBC (“Too toxic a thing”) – and you will not go to Sharm el-Sheikh, in Egypt, to the Cop27. However, with The Climate Book draws his idea of ​​what needs to be done to stop the end of the world as we know it now. The division into 5 parts is simple: it is made up of as many questions. Three 'how' and two 'what'. How science works, how the planet is changing, how it all affects us

Greta Thunberg: 'Yes to nuclear power, better than coal'. That's why her words cause discussion – guard



TROOPS BLA BLA BLA – Now that 'blah blah blah' she took care of filling it with content. You will not enter politics – you have just declared to the BBC (“Too toxic a thing”) – and you will not go to Sharm el-Sheikh, in Egypt, to the Cop27. However, with The Climate Book draws his idea of ​​what needs to be done to stop the end of the world as we know it now. The division into 5 parts is simple: it is made up of as many questions. Three 'how' and two 'what'. How science works, how the planet is changing, how it all affects us. And then what have we done and what must we do. It is not only the Swedish activist who answers. She frames and puts her seal on each of the passages. The subchapters are signed by prestigious experts, activists and intellectuals: the Indian writer Amitav Ghosh, the Canadian poet Margaret Atwood, the French economist Thomas Piketty together with professors and researchers, between Oxford, Harvard and Vienna. We talk about everything. 'From the melting of glacial platforms to the economy', Thunberg lists herself, 'from fast fashion to the loss of species, from pandemics to disappearing islands, from deforestation to the reduction of fertile soil, from water shortages to the sovereignty of indigenous peoples , from future food production to the carbon budget». Those who know the subject best paint the picture, raise the crucial points, suggest solutions. Greta sews the story from chapter to chapter, always leaving it clear where she leads her trajectory. You start from the origins, from the discovery of climate change. Michael Oppenheimer, professor of Geosciences at Princeton, has been taking it since 1896, when the Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius 'expressed no concern by publishing his famous prediction that by releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere through the burning of coal, humanity would to warm the Earth by several degrees. Johan Rockström, professor in Potsdam, with simple graphs shows today's surge in all socio-economic trends, from transport to fertilizer and water consumption. This is what we experience today: the abnormal heat that makes us spend Halloween in our shirts, the air pollution that makes us sick. Not even the clouds can we look with serenity anymore. “Beyond a certain level of CO2 concentration, they could act as a tipping point,” predicts Paulo Ceppi, a physicist at Imperial College London. And then droughts and floods, rising seas and forest fires: the cause and effects of everything are explained.

SALVATION IS WINNING TOGETHER – «The snowball has set in motion», announces Greta, sometimes a little too much in the role of Cassandra: a continuous warning of danger can push us to look the other way. However, many scientists who agree on such gloomy forecasts for the case in which the causes of the climate crisis, from the use of fossil fuels to intensive agriculture, do not stop. 'It is essential that we, the people who live in the world, rethink the way we consume and change it,' explains British scientist Mike Berners-Lee. «The earth is not only where we live. It is also what we live on,” recalls the German scientist Alexander Popp. We need '1.5° lifestyles', explains Kate Raworth, economist at Oxford University (the threshold of 1.5°C higher in 2030 than in the pre-industrial era is the goal of the Paris Agreement signed by 183 countries ). But the conclusion of the 'Manifesto' is broader: from the beginning, Greta recalls how there are peoples and social classes who pay the price for a dramatic situation created by others, first and foremost by Western countries. Salvation, however, can only be for everyone together. «The answer to the question of whether we should focus on changing individuals or the system is that there cannot be one without the other… Solving the climate crisis is not a task that can be left to individuals or even to the market. To keep us on track with our climate goals – and thus avoid the worst risks of triggering a catastrophe – we need to change our entire societies », she says. Greta will not go to the UN summit, and she says she does not want to enter the arena for power. But with The Climate Book its political program put it in full force.

Source: oggi.it